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Year : 2006  |  Volume : 49  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 620-2

Emerging vancomycin resistance in enterococci in India.


Department of Microbiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014

Correspondence Address:
U Ghoshal
Department of Microbiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 17183879

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Infection caused by vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) leads to adverse outcome and is a real challenge. Despite increasing reports of VRE in different countries, there is scanty data on this issue from India. A total of 685 enterococci were isolated from various clinical samples from January to December 2004. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed as prescribed by National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Vancomycin resistance was confirmed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Resistant phenotype was determined by Polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 685, 456 (67%) were E. faecalis and 229 (33%) were E. faecium. Resistance to various antibiotics in E. faecalis and E. faecium was as follows: ampicillin 33% and 54%, erythromycin 91% and 86%, ciprofloxacin 69% and 81%, tetracycline 50% and 54% and high level gentamicin resistance in 62% and 77% respectively. Vancomycin resistance was confirmed in 10 (1.4%) cases by MIC and all had Van A phenotype by PCR. Emergence of vancomycin resistant enterococci is of great concern because of its epidemic potential and scanty therapeutic options. Prompt diagnosis and efficient infection control measures can restrict its spread.


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