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Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 211-214

Amygdalin inhibits angiogenesis in the cultured endothelial cells of diabetic rats


1 Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Vali-Asr Hospital; Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3 Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine; Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4 Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Shahnaz Khaghani
Biochemistry Department, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6447, Tehran
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0377-4929.97874

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Background: Angiogenesis contributes to different physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate for the first time the antiangiogenic effects of amygdalin on the cultured endothelial cells of diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were divided into two equal groups of control and amygdalin-treated animals. Eight weeks after the induction of diabetes, amygdalin was injected intraperitoneally (3 mg/kg) to the rats of the treatment group. One day later, rats were sacrificed; the aortic arteries were excised and cut as 2 mm rings. Each aortic ring was incubated in a cell-culture well for 7 days. The process of angiogenesis was monitored by counting the number of microvessels and primary microtubules in each well. Results: Optic microscopy showed proliferation and migration of new endothelial cells to the fibrin gels. The endothelial cells produced primary microtubules which gradually made several branches and finally made a vascular matrix. The number of the primary microtubules and microvessels were significantly lower in the amygdalin-treated vs. control group (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Therefore, amygdalin exerts inhibitory effects on angiogenesis in aortic rings of diabetic rats and may pave a new way for treatment of unfavorable angiogenic conditions.


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