Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology
Home About us Instructions Submission Subscribe Advertise Contact e-Alerts Ahead Of Print Login 
Users Online: 1191
Print this page  Email this page Bookmark this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
IJPM is coming out with a Special issue on "Genitourinary & Gynecological pathology including Breast". Please submit your articles for these issues
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 279-283

Pathology of thyroid in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome


1 Department of Pathology, Grant Government Medical College and Sir J. J. Hospital, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Pathology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Dhaneshwar Namdeorao Lanjewar
Department of Pathology, Grant Government Medical College and Sir J. J. Hospital, Byculla, Mumbai - 400 008, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0377-4929.188143

Rights and Permissions

Background: The course of human immunodeficiency virus infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can be complicated by a variety of endocrine abnormalities, including abnormalities of thyroid gland. Materials and Methods: This study was designed to understand the spectrum of pathology of thyroid in Indian patients with AIDS. The present study describes the findings of retrospective autopsy findings of 158 patients with AIDS which revealed infectious diseases from a time period before the use of highly active antiretroviral regimen. Results: A wide range of bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were observed. Tuberculosis was recorded in 14 (09%) patients, Cryptococcus neoformans in 11 (7%) patients and cytomegalovirus in 3 (2%) patients. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and lymphocytic thyroiditis were seen in 02 (01%) patients each. One patient had dual infection comprising of tuberculosis and cytomegalovirus infection. The other microscopic findings observed were goiter (2 patients), interstitial fibrosis in thyroid (7 patients), and calcification in thyroid (8 patients). Conclusions: Abnormalities of thyroid are uncommon findings in patients with HIV infection however several case reports of thyroid involvement by infectious agents and neoplasm are described in these patients; hence patients with HIV infection should be closely followed up for development of goiter or abnormalities of thyroid functions.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2357    
    Printed46    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded341    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal